Terre des hommes

Perfect! I’ve been meaning to post another entry in my Lost Artefacts occasional series. This will actually be the second lost-artefacts post, officially making it a “series.” Plus it will satisfy another of the 30-day challenge posts. Win-win!

When I walk to work in the summer, I make a final climb from the Rideau Canal up to Queen street via a somewhat dilapidated set of steps outside the National Arts Centre. Plunked on the lawn, halfway up that flight, is a stone sculpture of two figures embracing and staring up at the sky.

This is Terre des hommes by Suzanne Guité (Quebec, 1967); a sculpture that was (according to the nearby plaque) “first seen at Expo 67. The name Terre des hommes reflects the theme of Expo 67 – Man and His World.”

It’s a lovely little piece of art that I suspect most people pass by without sparing a second glance.

I have no idea what the artist wanted to impart with it, but here’s what I get. It sits outdoors, exposed to the elements, and the two faces – after 40+ years of staring up at the rain – are now showing serious signs of erosion. “In his world,” man is only here for a short time. I get a strong sense of our impermanence from this piece – despite it being made from as stable a medium as stone.

But I could be full of $h!t.





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4 responses »

  1. Freedom Smith says:

    That is an interesting sculpter piece. Your theory could well be what the artist had in mind. It is hard to know, isn’t it.

  2. I quite like your interpretation. I’ll have to watch out for this art piece and contemplate it in real life if I ever pass it by 🙂

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